Intro to Domes

Financing and Revenue: Dome Business

Some domes are built exclusively to serve specific users – such as a university practice facility. Others are versatile workhorses with a solid indoor sports complex business plan that serves several types of users and hobbyists. All domes have potential to generate revenue and pay for themselves. However, it’s the well-managed domes that schedule their off-peak hours wisely that will rack up profitability.

Icons representing financing and revenue opportunities for an air dome

An indoor sports complex business plan

Frisbee inside an air dome

It can be surprising to see which groups and users are attracted to dome space. Like the fly fishermen who come in on a regular basis to practice their casting.

Or the enterprising woman who rents her local dome for a massive annual sale of baby clothes.

When drafting your air dome business plan, think about hosting fundraisers, music events and sportsmen shows. Other users include drone flyers, Frisbee leagues and police canine training units.

Financing your dome

Public financing Municipally owned domes provide a community service by facilitating wellness and health. Bonds and tax revenue are typically used to finance dome construction.

Schools Private schools may have designated funding sources or donors to help underwrite the cost of dome construction. Public schools and universities may create set-aside budgets to build domes, which may be wholly or partially funded by tax revenue.

Private Entrepreneurs building athletic domes typically apply for loans the same as any business would. Corporations and manufacturers may build specialty domes, such as those used to store inventory or materials.